KK2.0 Flight Controller – Setup and Settings

 

RC Pro Setup Guide by: Tom Zadar

 

 

KK2.0 Flight Controller Board with v1.6 firmware

I am using this Flight Controller Board on my Walkera QR X400.

 

I would like to thank multirotormaniac who helped me out with all of my questions.
He also double checked this setup guide for me and let me know a couple more things I should add to it.

 

 

Overview:

There are so many setup guides, settings, and videos for the KK2.0 that it’s hard to know where to start so I am making a simple 12 step setup guide.
This is my first Flight Control Board. I have never had one before or knew anything about programming one and with so many videos and setup guides I didn’t know where to start.

 

 

Setup:

 

Step 1: Program a model in your transmitter and use Acro mode. Bind the transmitter to the receiver you are using.

* I reset a current model in my Spektrum DX7, Reversed AILE and ELEV, selected Arco mode then bound to the receiver.

Step 2: Mount the KK2.0 onto your Quad. The arrow on the bottom of the board goes towards the front of the quad. The buttons will be on the back of the quad so you will need to turn it around to see the LCD screen and program it.
Do not use metal hardware to mount the KK2. It may short out the PCB tracks on the KK2 and ruin it.
Use nylon hardware. I made a plastic plate and used double sided tape to secure the FC. This will also help absorb vibrations.

Step 3: Mount your Power Distribution Board, Receiver, and ESC’s. Hookup the ESC power wires to the Power Distribution Board.

Step 4: Hook up the Receiver plugs into the Receiver Flight Controller. Hook up the motor wires into the Flight Controller.
The negative (black or brown) lead towards the edge of the FC.

 

Picture Courtesy of HobbyKing. Click picture for full size.

 

 

The video covers Step 4.

 

 

Step 5: Do a Receiver Test on the Flight Controller. Make sure the sticks are moving in the correct direction, if not go into your transmitter and reverse the channels that are working in the opposite direction.
Make sure all the numbers in the Receiver test screen for Aileron, Elevator, Throttle, and Rudder are at “0″. If not go into your transmitter sub trim and adjust them up or down as needed.
On my DX7 I only had to use a value of “1″ on each channel.

Step 6: Go into Load Motor Layout and select the type that you have. EX: Quad, Tri, etc.

Step 7: Go into Show Motor Layout. This is the direction that you motors need to spin. Check each one and if any are reversed, reverse any two motor wires on your ESC which will reverse the motor direction.

Step 8: Calibrate the ESC’s -  TAKE OFF THE PROPELLERS OR DISCONNECT ONE WIRE FROM EACH MOTOR

1: Turn on the transmitter and set the throttle to max.
2: Press down button 1 and 4, keep pressing until last step. Releasing the buttons aborts the calibration.
3: Turn on power to the FC
4: Wait for the ESC to beep its full throttle calibrated signal. When You hear two short beeps put the throttle all the way down. Wait until you hear one short beep then release the buttons.
The ESC’s are now calibrated

 

The video covers Steps 5, 6, 7, 8.

 

 

Step 9: Do a Sensor test. If they all read “OK” continue on. Next do the ACC Calibration – Use a bubble level to get the quad perfectly level or set the quad on a level surface if you don’t have a bubble level.

Here is the method I used to level the quad with a bubble level.

 

Step 10: Choose how you want to turn on and off Self-Level mode. This is in Mode Settings, Self-Level. Choose Aux or Stick. If you choose Aux you can turn on and off Self-Level mode on your transmitter with a switch. On my Spektrum DX7 my Flap switch selects Self-Level mode and Acro mode.
If you choose Stick you turn on and off Self-Level mode by holding the aileron to the right when arming or disarming. Turn it of with left aileron.

Step 11: If you want to use the Low Battery Alarm feature you will need to solder two wires to the Flight Controller Board. See this video. If you don’t use the Low Battery Alarm feature leave the default setting for for the alarm which is in Misc. Settings, Alarm 1/10 Volts.

Here is a post by the person who made this video. This is what I did.

* For a multirotor, just run a single positive wire from the power distribution board into the small hole on the board. The negative wire is redundant unless you are running on a plane.

 

 

 

Step 12: You are ready for a test flight. You can use the default settings for starting points as I did for version 1.6 firmware.

I recommend you try Self-Level for your first flight as I did. Also I would put in some D/R and Expo in your transmitter should the quad be to responsive you can flick the switch. Here is what I used.
D/R: 50% Expo: 30% on switch position 1 and D/R: 70% Expo: 30% switch position 2. Use more or less D/R and Expo if needed.
Another option if it is too responsive is to turn down the numbers in the Stick Scaling. Higher numbers gives higher response.

The stock value for Self-Level P Gain: is 100. I would put it at 50 and adjust it from there as needed. 100 might be too much to start with.

 

Here is a great video on Self-Level settings.

 

To Arm and Disarm the Flight Controller: Arm with right rudder and zero throttle. Disarm with left rudder and zero throttle.

Power the quad and lift off a bit (about a foot or so) and check that the quad goes in the direction of the sticks. If OK you should be good for your first test flight.
Go easy on the sticks until you see how the quad reacts. The quad was way to responsive for me so I used D/R and Expo which tamed it down a lot.

 

 

 

Default Settings

PI Editor

Axis: Roll (Aileron)

P Gain: 50
P Limit: 100
I Gain: 25
I Limit: 20

Axis: Pitch (Elevator)

P Gain: 50
P Limit: 100
I Gain: 25
I Limit: 20

Axis: Yaw (Rudder)

Yaw P Gain: 50
Yaw P Limit: 20
Yaw I Gain: 50
Yaw I Limit: 10

Mode settings:

Self-Level: Stick
Link Roll Pitch: Yes
Auto Disarm: Yes
CPPM Enabled: No

Stick Scaling:

Roll (Ail) : 30
Pitch (Eli) : 30
Yaw (Rud) : 50
Throttle:90

Misc Settings:

Minimum throttle: 10
Height Dampening: 0
Height D. Limit: 30
Alarm 1/10 volts:
Servo filter: 50

Self level settings:

P Gain: 100
P limit: 25
ACC Trim Roll: 0
ACC Trim Pitch: 0

 

 

My Settings

PI Editor

Axis: Roll (Aileron)

P Gain: 60
P Limit: 100
I Gain: 35
I Limit: 20

Axis: Pitch (Elevator)

P Gain: 60
P Limit: 100
I Gain: 35
I Limit: 20

Axis: Yaw (Rudder)

Yaw P Gain: 70
Yaw P Limit: 20
Yaw I Gain: 60
Yaw I Limit: 13

Mode settings:

Self-Level: AUX
Link Roll Pitch: Yes
Auto Disarm: Yes
CPPM Enabled: No

Stick Scaling:

Roll (Ail) : 30
Pitch (Eli) : 30
Yaw (Rud) : 50
Throttle: 100

Misc Settings:

Minimum throttle: 10
Height Dampening: 0 (A value of 10 worked well for me when I tried Height Dampening).
Height D. Limit: 30
Alarm 1/10 volts: 108 (10.8v) *Leave the setting at default
if you are not going to use the alarm feature.
Servo filter: 50

Self level settings:

P Gain: 60
P limit: 30
ACC Trim Roll: 5
ACC Trim Pitch: 2

Mixer Editor: All default Settings
Anything else not listed are defaults

 

Here is a video I made of my settings. Some settings have been changed since I made the video.

 

 

 

 

 

How to fine tune your Quad

I used this guide after I flew my quad with the default settings which some settings I changed in both Self-Level and Acro mode.

 

Originally Posted by kapteinkuk on RcGroups

 

Roll/pitch P-tuning:

Set the gains and limits to the following values:

Roll/Pitch P-gain: 30 (For a small 25cm size set to 20)
Roll/Pitch P-limit: 100
Roll/Pitch I-gain: 0
Roll/Pitch I-limit: 20

Yaw P-gain: 50
Yaw P-limit: 20
Yaw I-gain: 0
Yaw I-limit: 10

Now, Increase Roll/Pitch P-gain by 10 (5 or less for a small aircraft) at a time, and test your aircraft response by hovering and move the left stick in short and fast movements.

As you increase the gain you will notice:

1: The aircraft reacts faster and feels more connected to the stick movement and wander less on its own.
2: The aircraft may oscillate for a short time. Usually a few oscillations, but may be more if gain is high. If it oscillates continually the gain is too high.
3: The aircraft may be harder to land, it bounces back when touching down.
4: The aircraft may climb.

When the aircraft has a good response and does not oscillate or climb when testing, P-gain is good.

———————–

Roll/pitch I-tuning:

1: Trim it level.
2: Fly fast forward and center the stick.

If it level itself, increase I-gain.
If it stays in attitude, I-gain is good.

Alternatively setting I gain to 50-100% of P-gain does the trick.

Yaw P-tuning

Increase Yaw P-gain by 10 (5 or less for a small aircraft) at a time, and test your aircraft response by hovering and move the Yaw control stick until it have

yawed about a quarter of a circle, and then center it.

As you increase the gain you will notice:

1: The aircraft start and stops faster.
2: The aircraft overshoots less.
2: The aircraft may start to climb or descend.

When the aircraft has a good response, has a minimum of overshoot and does not climb or descend, P-gain is good.

Alternatively, set it to 100% of Roll/Pitch P-gain

Yaw I-tuning

Increase Yaw I-gain by 10 (5 or less for a small aircraft) at a time, do the same test as above.

When the aircraft overshoots even less, I-gain is good.

Alternatively, set it to 100% of Yaw P-gain.

If you have a small and not dangerous aircraft, you can disturb it around the yaw-axis and see if it returns. increase if not.

It is generally good to keep the gain values in the low range. Excessive gain may introduce vibration and control issues.

 

 

 

 

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